Australia 2011 Year Rabbit Lunar II $2 2 Oz Pure Silver PERTH MINT ROLL OF 5

Australia 2011 Year Rabbit Lunar II $2 2 Oz Pure Silver PERTH MINT ROLL OF 5
Australia 2011 Year Rabbit Lunar II $2 2 Oz Pure Silver PERTH MINT ROLL OF 5
Australia 2011 Year Rabbit Lunar II $2 2 Oz Pure Silver PERTH MINT ROLL OF 5
Australia 2011 Year Rabbit Lunar II $2 2 Oz Pure Silver PERTH MINT ROLL OF 5

Australia 2011 Year Rabbit Lunar II $2 2 Oz Pure Silver PERTH MINT ROLL OF 5
Celebrate the most friendly Year of the Rabbit. With this large yet affordable 2 troy ounce pure silver coin!

This listing is for a full and original mint-wrapped roll of 5 x 2 Troy Ounce Pure Silver Rabbit coins! This large, impressive coin represents a tremendous value, struck in pure silver! These new Series II Lunar Zodiac coins are hugeat 55.60 mm in diameter they are more than 2 inches across! The Perth Mint refers to this as their specimen finish. It's much nicer than an ordinary silver coin - the mirrored design is highlighted on frosted, matte fields (or background).

We would therefore refer to this as a "reverse proof" or "reverse proof-like" finish. Between its size and the beauty of the finish, we think you'll be impressed with this affordable, pure silver rabbit! The Year of the Rabbit - Most Cuddly! Centuries ago, the Chinese invented a calendar based on the lunar (rather than the solar) cycle.

There are twelve animals in the Chinese lunar zodiac, each corresponding in sequence to a year rather than a month. In 2011 we celebrate the Year of the Rabbit.

According to tradition, people born during a Year of the Rabbit (1915, 1927, 1939, 1951, 1963, 1975, 1987, 1999, and 2011) are said to exhibit that animals attributes. They are sociable, amiable, and artistic, and are often shy, soft-spoken and cautious. They are often noted for their elegance and good taste. Rabbits can be moody, superficial and self-centered, as well.

This is the fourth annual release in the Lunar Series II zodiac program that began in 2008. The rabbit is not the strongest animal in a physical sense of the twelve Chinese zodiacal signs; they are dedicated and sensitive. Rabbits are usually kind and sweet; this makes them popular people. Nobody ignores them, for they are good company and know how to make the best of themselves.

Even though they are popular and loved by their friends and family, rabbit people can also be pessimistic. They are conservative and insecure, and that explains why most of the them don't like changes.

It is not easy to provoke Rabbit people, as they are calm. They don't like to argue and enjoy quiet, peaceful lives. They are also sentimental, compassionate and loyal. One can do much worse than to have a Rabbit as a friend! Rabbits in Australia - A Tragedy of Unintended Consequences.

Rabbits are not native to Australia - they are an invasive species, first introduced to the Island Continent 150 years ago. One Thomas Austin released 12 wild rabbits onto his property, Barwon Park, near Winchelsea, Victoria, in October 1859 for hunting purposes. He had asked his nephew William Austin to send him 12 gray rabbits, five hares, 72 partridges and some sparrows from England so that he could continue his hobby in Australia by creating a local population of the species.

One theory as to why the Barwon Park rabbits adapted so well to Australia is that the hybrid rabbits that resulted from the interbreeding of the two distinct two types were particularly hardy and virile. At the time Austin had stated, The introduction of a few rabbits could do little harm and might provide a touch of home, in addition to a spot of hunting.

With mild winters, they were able to breed the entire year. With widespread farming, areas that may have been desert, scrub, or woodlands were instead turned into vast areas with low vegetations, creating ideal habitat for rabbits. In a classic example of unintended consequences, within ten years of the introduction in 1859, rabbits had become so prevalent that two million could be shot or trapped annually without having any noticeable effect on the population. It was the fastest spread ever recorded of any mammal anywhere in the world.

Since their introduction, the effect of rabbits on the ecology of Australia has been devastating. Rabbits are suspected of being the most significant known factor in species loss in Australia. The loss of plant species is unknown at this time. Rabbits often kill young trees in orchards, forests and on properties by ringbarking or girdling them. Rabbits are also responsible for serious erosion problems as they eat native plants, leaving the topsoil exposed and vulnerable to sheet, gully and wind erosion.

The removal of this topsoil is devastating to the land as it takes many hundreds of years to regenerate. Annually, European rabbits cause millions of dollars of damage to crops. A nurturing mother rabbit keeps an eye on her young baby bunny while both shelter beneath overhanging foliage. The legend YEAR OF THE RABBIT defines the theme. The Chinese character for "Rabbit" is to the right, while the Perth Mint's "P" mint mark is judiciously placed to the left, near the 9:30 position along the rim.

The reverse features Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, in crowned profile facing right. This portrait, featuring Her Majesty wearing a tiara and pearl earrings, was executed by the sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley. The legend 2 OZ 999 SILVER guarantees the weight and purity. The legend ELIZABETH II and the denomination also appear.

Each roll of five encapsulated Silver Rabbit coins is sealed inside a clear plastic wrap roll, as issued by the Perth Mint of Australia. 311.35g (5 x 62.270 g). 55.60 mm more than 2 inches! The item "Australia 2011 Year Rabbit Lunar II $2 2 Oz Pure Silver PERTH MINT ROLL OF 5" is in sale since Friday, February 5, 2021.

This item is in the category "Coins & Paper Money\Coins\ World\Europe\France". The seller is "talismancoins" and is located in Saint Louis, Missouri. This item can be shipped worldwide.
Australia 2011 Year Rabbit Lunar II $2 2 Oz Pure Silver PERTH MINT ROLL OF 5


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